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28 November 2019

Hadding & Cantwell discuss Thanksgiving and the Impact of the Arrival of Europeans on Ambient Hunter-Gatherers



This is an excerpt from the Outlaw Conservative show of 27 November 2019.


A little more information about Squanto

He was the sole survivor of a disease epidemic that struck the Patuxet tribe, who had lived at the site of Plymouth before the Pilgrims. The Patuxet had been part of the Wampanoag Confederation based in what we now call Rhode Island. 

Since the whole confederation had been severely reduced in numbers by disease, leaving them vulnerable to conquest by the nearby Narangansett Confederation, Squanto was able to convince the Wampanoag king Massasoit to make an alliance with the musket-bearing Englishmen.

The native who first contacted the Pilgrims was not Squanto but Samoset, an Abenaki sagamore who had become acquainted with Englishmen through their fishing expeditions and camps around the Gulf of Maine. Samoset, traveling through the area, noticed the Pilgrims' settlement and approached to ask for beer. On his next visit Samoset brought Squanto, because Squanto had been to England and spoke much better English.

Lynn Ceci, in Science magazine of 4 April 1975, demonstrates that the agricultural technique of burying a fish with maize to make it grow better was one that Squanto himself had most likely learned from other Englishmen (source). 

The traditional belief in the Red Man's wisdom and benevolence toward the Pilgrims is superficially informed and unrealistically idealized.

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