"I have been reading your amazing blog and listening to some of your podcasts with Carolyn. Not sure how I haven't run across your work before. Amazing stuff." (reader's comment, 10 May 2016)
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07 December 2019

Facts don't care about Ben Shapiro's Holocaust



This redacted clip from the Radical Agenda show of 2 December 2019 contains foul language and adult references.



At Stanford University on 7 November 2019 Ben Shapiro quoted a document from the Communist legal system of post-war Poland, to the effect that 2500 corpses per day were cremated by a crew working in Krema II of Birkenau. According to information from the manufacturer of the crematory ovens used at Birkenau, Topf und Söhne, this is simply impossible. 

There were 15 crematory retorts in Krema II and each could cremate (on average) one body per hour. In 24 hours of continuous operation, then, 360 bodies could be cremated. All the 38 retorts in Birkenau operating continuously for 24 hours could cremate 912 bodies. 

It's really worse than that, because the ovens had to be out of service for 3 or 4 hours each day to be cleaned. In that case the maximum possible numbers are 315 for Krema II and 798 for Birkenau as a whole.

The idea that cremations could be accomplished faster by piling in bodies seems to be based on the assumption that a crematorium functions like an open fire, where the energy released as heat is mostly wasted. In fact a crematorium, especially the kind used at Auschwitz-Birkenau, functions more like an oven for baking food, where the temperature is controlled and waste of energy is minimized. It is a well known fact that in a household oven the time required for cooking a piece of meat is roughly proportional to the mass. This rule also applies to crematory ovens.


Apart from false testimonies like Tauber's, there is no reason to believe that Birkenau's crematoria were operated to the maximum extent possible. A document discovered by Carlo Mattogno refers to a "twelve-hour workday" in relation to fuel-consumption. Also, some of Birkenau's crematoria spent considerable time out of service needing repairs, which surely would not have been allowed if the full capacity for cremation had been needed at all times.

The impossibly high rate of cremation claimed in Tauber's deposition seems to have been calculated to support the old Soviet line, that 4 to 5 million died in Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Auschwitz Museum's current claim (still a gross exaggeration) is that only about 1.1 million died there.

Indisputably, that document from the Communist legal system of post-war Poland makes absurdly inflated claims about how fast corpses could be cremated in Birkenau concentration camp, and Ben Shapiro was a fool to trust it.

Shapiro felt the need to try to demonstrate the factuality of the Holocaust because of Nick Fuentes' mockery of it in a video-clip from last January, which had been dredged up and publicized as a way of attacking Fuentes after his followers humiliated the representatives of a phony conservative organization called Turning Point USA. A discussion of the conflict around Nick Fuentes can be read here: America First vs. Holocaustian Mind-Control.

28 November 2019

Hadding & Cantwell discuss Thanksgiving and the Impact of the Arrival of Europeans on Ambient Hunter-Gatherers



This is an excerpt from the Outlaw Conservative show of 27 November 2019.


A little more information about Squanto

He was the sole survivor of a disease epidemic that struck the Patuxet tribe, who had lived at the site of Plymouth before the Pilgrims. The Patuxet had been part of the Wampanoag Confederation based in what we now call Rhode Island. 

Since the whole confederation had been severely reduced in numbers by disease, leaving them vulnerable to conquest by the nearby Narangansett Confederation, Squanto was able to convince the Wampanoag king Massasoit to make an alliance with the musket-bearing Englishmen.

The native who first contacted the Pilgrims was not Squanto but Samoset, an Abenaki sagamore who had become acquainted with Englishmen through their fishing expeditions and camps around the Gulf of Maine. Samoset, traveling through the area, noticed the Pilgrims' settlement and approached to ask for beer. On his next visit Samoset brought Squanto, because Squanto had been to England and spoke much better English.

Lynn Ceci, in Science magazine of 4 April 1975, demonstrates that the agricultural technique of burying a fish with maize to make it grow better was one that Squanto himself had most likely learned from other Englishmen (source). 

The traditional belief in the Red Man's wisdom and benevolence toward the Pilgrims is superficially informed and unrealistically idealized.

03 October 2019

Will Trump become USA's Dictator?



Thomas Edsall of the New York Times wrote a column (2 October 2019) presenting and endorsing the paranoid projections of degreed and tenured leftists who accuse President Donald Trump of intending a "coup" in the form of refusing to leave office if he loses the next election. Hadding explains why the accusation is sadly unjustified. (This is an excerpt from the Outlaw Conservative show of 2 October 2019.)


Trump Not Alone in his Assessment

On Tuesday 1 October 2019 President Trump made a post on Twitter to the effect that the movement to impeach him amounted to a coup. Trump's enemies are acting as if this were some kind of crazy talk, but Trump is far from alone in that opinion. Even some of his enemies have been using that word to characterize the efforts to undermine or terminate his presidency, for more than a year.

24 August 2018, Michael Hayden, former director of the National Security Agency:

“I think impeachment would be a bad idea. If President Trump is somehow forced to leave office before the end of his first term, one-third of America will believe it was a soft coup...."

5 September 2018, David A Graham, The Atlantic, discusses Bob Woodward's book Fear, and an anti-Trump op-ed written anonymously (probably by Jon Lerner) for the New York Times:

"... the actions described in the book and in the op-ed are extremely worrying, and amount to a soft coup against the president.

6 September 2018, Chuck Todd:

"There is either a soft coup underway or the president is unfit for office."

The point of the concern about Trump's use of the word coup, and his comments in 2016 about electoral irregularities, is that if the electoral process is now being voided by a "coup" or if the elections themselves are crooked, then the system is already dead and there can no longer be any moral argument for respecting the Constitution and not simply seizing power. Michael Hayden warned against trying to remove Trump from office precisely because it would induce "one-third of America" that currently respects the Constitution to begin thinking outside of the Constitutionalist box (as has been for decades the exclusive prerogative of the anti-White left, especially in the form of crooked rulings by courts). The fear is that the White majority, struggling against reduction to minority status, may cease fighting with one arm tied behind its back.

We have been headed in this direction for some years now. See my article  from 2012, Welcome to the Banana Republic.

23 July 2019

German Rocket-Scientists Not Getting Their Due




Eugene Cagle, NASA's engineering manager for the Saturn rocket program, regarded the role of Wernher von Braun in the American space program as crucial:

“(Von Braun) was the main player in all the work that went on. We might have been successful (without him), but not in the '60s. He was a great leader.” (V. Whitman, Times Daily, 20 July 1999)

How strange it is, then, that on the fiftieth anniversary of the first landing of Americans on the Moon, we have heard so much about the astronauts but very little about Wernher von Braun and his team of rocket-scientists from Germany – and that what we do hear about the German rocket-scientists today is largely negative.

Cagle's assessment is clearly correct. In the early 1950s the United States had two rocket programs, one run by the Army, which had the Germans, and one run by the Navy, which was plagued with failures. When the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was formed, it was built mainly around the team of Germans brought to the United States after the Second World War. We can safely conclude, therefore, that without Wernher von Braun and his team, there would have been many more failed rockets, and perhaps there would never have been a NASA.

As with some other big ideas, the idea of traveling to the Moon was a German elaboration of a French inspiration. Jules Verne's novel of 1865, De la Terre à la Lune, contained insights like the fact that Florida would be a good location for launches, but it was Hermann Oberth in the early 20th century who made the physical calculations of how acceleration out of the Earth's gravitational pull and into outer space might be possible. Fritz Lang's movie about a voyage to the Moon, die Frau im Mond (1921), and Oberth's book die Rakete in den Planetenräumen (1923), inspired a schoolboy named Wernher von Braun to learn the mathematics and the physics involved so that he himself might one day travel into outer space.


20 July 2019

Hadding & Cantwell, 8 July 2019: the March of Political Correctness



Funeral Scene from The Wild Angels with Peter Fonda, 1966. The movie represents the swastika and the cross as antitheses, reflecting Anglo-American propaganda more than historic National-Socialism, but the swastika as a symbol of rebellion against restrictions had a certain appeal, and was used that way in a number of cinematic productions in the 1960s.  Today you won't see that.

Musicians also used the swastika to indicate their independence from restrictive authority. From left to right, Siouxsie Sioux, Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead, Brian Jones of the Rolling Stones, Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols, and members of the Slovenian band Laibach. Several of these people in one way or another apologized under pressure. Sid Vicious most likely never apologized, but when the movie Sid and Nancy was made (1986), the swastika shirt was bowdlerized, replaced with a hammer-and-sickle shirt. Even the portrayal of a total degenerate like Sid Vicious wearing a swastika, as he often did, is for some people too much of an endorsement to be allowed. It would be surprising to see this today.
Talking to Cantwell, I conflated the plastic model kit of Tom Daniel's "Red Baron" with "Rommel's Rod." These were created in the late 60s and were sold for years in K-Mart. Both show that attitudes were very different in the 60s and 70s compared to now. "Nazi stuff" was cool -- and permitted.


Sadly the cutout of Adolf Hitler ultimately did not appear in the famous album-cover.

Bowie later apologized and proved that he really was a degenerate after all.

Two of the most popular series that ever aired on CBS Television featured characters whose cherished emblem was the Confederate Battle Flag -- which now, in the ratcheting-up of Political Correctness, has become a target for moralizing lunatics on a par with the swastika.

The Kurt H. Debus Conference Facility at Kennedy Space Center, named after the former ardent National-Socialist who was the USA's chief authority on rocket-launches from 1952 and retired as director of Kennedy Space Center in 1974. The conference-center has kept its name so far perhaps because there is no university-campus nearby.

04 July 2019

A Couple of New Memes

It has annoyed me for some months, seeing a two-frame cartoon that has an SA-man in the left frame and an Antifa thug in the right frame, both attacking "Free Speech." In the aftermath of the attack on Andy Ngo (and some others who got much less sympathy because they were straight, White non-journalists) in Portland, Oregon, this stupid cartoon has been trotted out again. I have altered the cartoon to make it more enlightening.



A few days ago I saw a photo that showed Dinesh D'Souza with an expression on his face that seems to me to convey more about his character than he would want anyone to know.

I have made a few variants on this meme, with different words for different contexts. This is the most general-purpose one. You can make your own variant with different text, but it should resemble something that D'Souza actually says, or at least implies. I don't know that he ever verbatim said, "Republicans believe that everybody is equal!" or, "Democrats are the real racists!" but a lot of his verbiage can be boiled down to those propositions. When it's stated so plainly, the ridiculousness is easier to see.

This one is about the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which, to the embarrassment of today's cowardly Republicans, presidential candidate Barry Goldwater opposed. 


Speaking of cowardly, backstabbing Republicans, there's this. It's not a meme in the normal sense but the information conveyed is important. The Republican Party has tried to give the pro-White voter just enough winks and dogwhistles to induce him to vote Republican instead of Democrat, while treating him more and more as an unwanted stepchild. Especially disgusting is the acquiescence of Southern White people in this abuse. I try to make them aware of it.

13 June 2019

Dinesh D'Souza teaches White Americans to Despise their own Great Men





Here is a 45-second adaptation from the above that I made for Twitter:




Dinesh D'Souza makes unsubstantiated categorical assertions and invalid arguments in support of reckless false conclusions. 


Dinesh D'Souza admits Republican
involvement in eugenic sterilization.
(In fact it was 19 out of 32, not 20.) 
When somebody produces a counterexample to one of his categorical assertions, his typical reaction is to minimize the counterexample's importance and to continue making the same general assertion. After I spent weeks in 2017 battering D'Souza on Twitter with the fact that eugenic sterilization a century ago was mainly a Republican cause, he began admitting that some Republicans like Lothrop Stoddard and Madison Grant had supported eugenic sterilization, but marginalized them as "RINOs," which they clearly were not. He also has put qualifiers on some of his other sweeping assertions: it is now not "all," but "the vast majority" of KKK leaders that he says were Democrats, and he no longer says that no Republican ever enacted a segregation law, but instead no Republican after the 1880s. When one of Dinesh D'Souza's unverified sweeping assertions is proven wrong, he makes an excuse and then keeps on saying it. 

In this video I go into detail about one example, D'Souza's argument that the Democrats were "the party of slavery," which employs bad logic and pretends to be based on the spurious assertion that no Republican owned a slave in 1860. The text for this presentation was written on 9 June 2019, after I noticed that someone had adduced the name of Francis Preston Blair as a slaveholder who was not only a Republican in 1860 but had helped to found the party. On the following day, Dinesh D'Souza did as I predicted, minimized the importance of the counterexample that he had tauntingly solicited for several years, and asserted that he was essentially correct in spite of it. 

An important principle in dealing with a dishonest interlocutor like Dinesh D'Souza is not to let him set the rules of discourse. The leftist "twitterstorians" arguing with D'Souza made this mistake. They foolishly allowed D'Souza to tell them how they must approach his argument, and now -- surprise, surprise -- after they've jumped through his hoop D'Souza is still not admitting that he was wrong.